Country #41: Honduras

Hello, Central America!
Country #41 is Honduras. Looking forward to jumping right in; I’ve got my book lined up, and I’m ready to learn.

Reading The Gambia: The Sun Will Soon Shine

Though she be but littleshe is fierce.” – William Shakespeare

The Sun Will Soon Shine by Sally Sadie Singhateh is all the proof  you’ll ever need that a powerful story can be told with the slightest of touches.

Clocking in at just over 100 pages, this slim book packs a serious punch with a protagonist you love right away; you deeply feel her pain, and her triumphs.

A Woman Walking, Gambia
A Woman Walking, Gambia

 

Reading Singapore: The Art of Charlie Chan Hock Chye

Going back over some older ground…because I never read a book about Singapore. Which is ridiculous.

The wait was worth it! On the recommendation of very smart book blogger, Bibloglobal, I picked up The Art of Charlie Chan Hock Chey by Sonny Liew and I’m so very glad I did.

Dazzling. Brilliant. A complete vision executed flawlessly.
I don’t know – I COULD GO ON AND ON.

I’m blown away. It’s that good. And I won’t discuss it further, because I might ruin it for you. Just one more thing: don’t read any other reviews before you dig into this graphic novel. Wait until after and all shall be illuminated…trust me!

Cover of The Art of Charlie Chan Hock Chye
Cover of The Art of Charlie Chan Hock Chye (image from http://www.sonnyliew.com)

 

Country #40: The Gambia

Back to West Africa, and I’m thrilled! This will be my first in-depth introduction to The Gambia, and I’m truly excited about it. A country surrounded on three sides by another country (Senegal), and dominated by a single natural feature (the Gambia river), just the physical dynamics of the place seem super cool. Very ready to jump in, meet some new people via my reading, and have the chance to cook some more delicious Western African food.

Here we go!

 

Wassu Stone Circles
Wassu Stone Circles (Image by shaunamullally, via Wikimedia Commons) Senegambian stone circles (megaliths) which run from Senegal through the Gambia and which are described by UNESCO as “the largest concentration of stone circles seen anywhere in the world”.